Data Driven Insight for Biometrics, Digital Identity & eIDs

Biometrics, Mobility, Digital Identity, ePassports, eIDs, Automated Border Control, eGates, Secure Documents...

Biometric Smartphone Market Explodes in 2016 as Prices Plunge

Posted: February 6th, 2017 | Author:

500 models from 87 vendors, 120 for $150 or Less 

Acuity Market Intelligence’s latest research finds that 87 smartphone vendors introduced 346 biometric smartphones in the past year. This brings the total number introduced since 2013 to 559, more than double the 200 models Acuity reported a year ago and a ten-fold increase in two years. The proliferation of biometric smartphones is extraordinary. This unprecedented growth supports Acuity’s assertion that within two years, biometrics will be as ubiquitous on smartphones as high resolution cameras are today.

Acuity analysis indicates nearly one billion biometric smartphones are currently in use representing 40% of the global smartphone market. Acuity expects this to grow to 100% of the two billion smartphones shipped annually within two years reaching 100% installed base penetration by 2022.

During 2014, 28 biometric smartphone vendors, most with single offerings, defined the market. Today, of the 87 vendors offering biometric smartphones, more than 30 offer at least six models and market leaders ZTE, Huawei, Lenovo, Samsung and Xiaomi have each introduced at least 20 models. At 7% model share, ZTE is in the top spot, followed by Huawei at 6.2%, and Lenovo, Xiaomi, and Coolpad each at about 4%. Samsung falls just below this threshold offering 3.4% of the biometric smartphone models. Another 22 vendors each offer at least 1% of the total number of models with the remaining 59 vendors collectively offering 35% of currently available biometric smartphone models

Though Android is the principal operating system powering 97% of all biometric smartphone models, Apple remains the dominant player capturing 45%-unit market share of the nearly one billion biometric smartphones in use today with just a handful of iPhone models.

In addition, biometric smartphone prices have dropped dramatically. The quarterly average price of a biometric smartphone decreased from $849 in Q1 2013 to $276 in Q4 2016. There are now 120 sub-$150 models on the market at an average price of $116, up from just 28 a year ago at an average price of $127

Acuity believes biometric smartphone growth will continue as mobile application security, particularly for financial services, requires biometric authentication, low-cost sensors drive down the cost of biometric integration, and consumers demand an end to password and pin based security.

Meanwhile, the Indian Government recently called on domestic handset manufactures to develop $30 smartphones. Integrating biometrics into smartphones at this price point would not only transform the Indian market of one billion, but would pave the way for mass replacement of traditional handsets across Asia, Africa, and the rest of the developing economies creating a globally available, universal biometric authentication platform.

Given these powerful market forces, Acuity is confident the market will achieve the 100% biometric smartphone penetration originally forecast for the end of 2018 in Acuity’s “Global Biometrics and Mobility Report.


Details available in the “Biometric Smartphone Update” spreadsheet which provides detailed information on every biometrics smartphone on the market including brand, model, biometric mode, sensor, OS, price, availability, and links to detailed specifications and reviews. Preview at www.acuity-mi.com/BSP.php.

“The Global Biometrics and Mobility Report” provides unit and revenue forecasts for biometric smartphones, tablets, and wearables, and biometric apps and payment. Preview at www.acuity-mi.com/GBMR_Report.php .


Filed under: Biometrics, Market Insight, Market Research, Mobile Biometrics, Mobility, Smart Devices, Smartphones, Uncategorized | No Comments »

Acuity Market Intelligence’s 2017 Crystal Ball

Posted: January 26th, 2017 | Author:


T
en Top Trends for Biometrics & Digital Identity

The following are Acuity’s prognostications for how the markets for Biometrics and Digital Identity will develop in 2017.  Over the next few weeks, I will elaborate on each one. Stay tuned …

 

 

#1: Behavioral biometrics on smartphones AND associated privacy issues and PII concerns will go mainstream.

#2: Iris biometrics breakout as smartphone availability drives consumer acceptance up and price points down.

#3: Security impact and liability implications of PII via Iot begin to sink in with Enterprise Executives.

#4: Cloud based biometrics are recognized as critical Infrastructure for global digital payments and commerce platforms.

#5: Link between digital identity, smartphones & mobile & stationary #smart devices begins to be monetized

#6: New monetization models for digital identity emerge, shifting power from commercial enterprises to consumers.

#7 Secure mobile smartphone credentials drive infrastructure development with migration from tests and pilots to deployments.

#8: Many fintech innovators are swallowed by large BFSIs thwarting their impact on industry transformation.

#9: A handful of fintech standouts committed to disruption emerge as potential threats to the status quo.

#10: Biometrics and digital identity begins to be understood as a force for social justice, equity, privacy, and accessibility.


Filed under: Biometrics, Disruption, e/mCommerce, Market Forecast, Market Insight, Market Research, Mobility, Payments, Smart Devices | No Comments »

Identity 3.0: Mobile Biometrics Redefine Digital Identity and Disrupt Global Commerce

Posted: August 20th, 2015 | Author:

wordle 10The global market for mobile biometrics is at the center of a firestorm of converging market forces driving new and complex relationships between identity, commerce, and the indispensable personal mobile devices that more than 6 billion consumers carry with them at all times. The proliferation of these powerful mobile devices within the emerging global ecosystem connecting commerce, community, and consumers has fundamentally changed the way we communicate, work, conduct business, shop, entertain ourselves, interact socially, and now identify ourselves.

Two central themes provide the context for understanding the scope of this massive market revolution:

The first is the transformation and convergence of commerce and privacy as they relate to individual consumer identity. How do consumers navigate this complex, interconnected world ensuring their privacy is protected and their PII is secure while they maintain frictionless access to the information, communities, and the goods and services they want to purchase?

Mobile iPhone and Watch MEDThe second is how will enterprises that rely on the accumulation, management, use, and sale of PII evolve or be displaced as this massive global platform based on personal mobile devices disrupts conventional business models? Can businesses based on data aggregation survive the creation of consumer centric ecosystems that transfer data ownership from commercial powerhouses to individual consumers?

This is the framework for evaluating the critical role biometrics has begun and will continue to play as the mobile identity ecosystem is conceived, constructed, and deployed across the globe over the next five years and beyond.

Got your attention?   For more register for Acuity’s Mobile Biometrics Webinar: Redefining Digital Identity and Disrupting Global Commerce on Sep 3, 2015 11:00 AM EDT.

The Webinar will draw extensively from Acuity’s latest research report The Global Biometrics and Mobility Report: The Convergence of Commerce and Privacy.


Filed under: Biometrics, Data Driven Analysis, e/mCommerce, Market Insight, Mobility, Payments, Smart Devices | No Comments »

Have/Will mobile phones become our de facto “global identity card”?

Posted: March 3rd, 2015 | Author:

This article is interesting food for thought ….

Mobile phones have quietly become a global identity device we don’t really need

By David Glance, University of Western Australia

Phone as ID

 

Mobile phones have become central to our lives. In the US, 90% of adults have one. Although we think of mobile phones for their primary role in communication, they have quietly become a global identification device. Governments, and their secret services and law enforcement agencies in particular, have in most countries moved to prevent individuals from being able to buy a mobile phone without producing official identification. As far as these agencies are concerned, being able to identify the owner of a mobile phone is essential in being able to track the parties in a conversation. For countries like Australia that are considering metadata retention, having people identifiable greaty facilitates the analysis and detection of information of interest.

The problem with requiring identification for purchasing mobile phones is the same problem as for collecting metadata of all citizens in a country, it is not a particularly effective means of stopping or even deterring crime or terrorism but it has a disproportionately large impact on privacy and civil liberties of ordinary people.

Requiring identification to buy pre-paid mobile phones for example has not been shown to increase detection of criminals and has had the opposite effect of creating markets for stolen phones and unidentifiable SIM cards. The sorts of criminals law enforcement and security services would be after would also be generally more than capable of avoiding using phones that they had personally bought. At the same time,

On the flip side, there are a range of scenarios in which law abiding citizens are disadvantaged by the need to produce identification in order to buy a phone. This can range from people who don’t have access to official identification documentation like the homeless, through to people in family situations who don’t have control over their documentation and so are prevented from using it for this purpose.

More insidious however has been the way social networks like Facebook have adopted the mobile phone as a way of preventing anonymity on their networks. Although Facebook does allow just an email to create and verify an account, if a phone number is used, it needs to be a number that has not been used before and is registered with a recognised telecommunications provider.
As Facebook states:

“We have limits in place to make sure that everyone is using their real
information on their account.”

There is no real way around this. Facebook mobile verification will not work with “virtual phone numbers” such as those that can be set up in different countries to forward to your real phone number or even to a “soft phone”.

In fact, there are services from companies such as Telesign that will do the telephone number verification to ensure that it is a legitimate number from a recognised service provider.

Another consequence of using mobile devices for identification purposes is that it also acts to limit technological advances. The inability to use virtual numbers that might be associated with Skype or other services for the purposes of verification means that ultimately, that flexibility that these services offer is compromised.

Countries like Australia, that have struggled with the population when trying to introduce national identity cards have met with no resistance when introducing proxies for this card and in particular, mandatory identification for mobile phone purchases. The argument for identity cards was given as the need to fight terrorism even though in the last terrorist attack in Australia, the identity and significant information about the terrorist, Monis, was actually known by intelligence services.

Even with this information, the attack went unforeseen. If 18 phone calls to report the individual could not alert the services to an imminent attack, the idea that they will be able to discover this information in metadata is dubious at best.

Identification features of the mobile phone have taken a bigger leap with the advent of fingerprint use in the Apple iPhone and other smartphones. The use of the fingerprint links phones to bank details and by design establish the identity of the phone user at any point in time. Of course, Apple, Samsung and other companies will claim that this information is not made available to governments, but post-Snowden, that argument no longer holds very much validity.

The surveillance of a population is an easy option for politicians, even when they struggle to understand the technologies involved. It gives the appearance of using sophisticated means to combat potential threats. It also, like the identification properties of mobile phones, gives a country hidden benefits in control of whistle-blowers and political activists. It also means that these actions can be carried out without oversight, making the abuse of this power almost inevitable.

This article was originally published on The Conversation.
Read the original article.


Filed under: Biometrics, eIDs, Market Development, Mobility, National ID, Smart Devices | No Comments »

“Mobility is the driving force that will unleash the long awaited biometric revolution”

Posted: January 27th, 2015 | Author:

Biometrics in mobile payments, banking, and a host of other mobiles services and applications are poised to transform and accelerate the globalization of mCommerce.

The latest research from Acuity Market Intelligence reveals a mobile biometric marketplace more complex, broadly based, and growing faster than previous forecasts indicate.

Acuity segments the mobile biometrics into three major sectors:

  • Biometric Sensors embedded in smart mobile devices: Smart Phones, Tablets, and Wearables.
  • Biometric Apps offered directly by biometric vendors, or downloaded to smart devices via mobile service providers such as banks, payment processors, social media sites, retailers, or online identity providers.
  • Biometric Authentication for payment and non-payment transactions provided via secure cloud-based services linked to Biometric Apps on smart devices.

Acuity projects that by 2020, global mobile biometric market revenues will reach $33.3 billion annually. This includes 4.76 billion biometrically enabled smart mobile devices generating $6 billion in biometric sensor revenue, 4 billion biometric app downloads generating $20 billion in annual revenues from direct purchase and software development fees, and 825 billion biometrical secured payment and non-payment transactions generating $6.8 billion in authentication fees.

Biometrics are a natural fit for the smart mobile devices we literally hold onto nearly every waking hour. The explosion in the use of smart devices over the past five years, along with anticipated growth over the next five — especially in developing economies where sub $100 smart phones have begun to alter the mobile landscape — will bring biometrics into the daily lives of half the global population. By 2020, 100% of smart mobile devices will include embedded biometric sensors as a standard feature

For more on the mobile biometric market, download your free copy of the NEW  Mobile Report Market Brief which previews Acuity market forecast data on mobile biometric smart devices, transactions, and global market revenue (Brief registration required).

For a comprehensive view of the marketplace and detailed forecasts, order The Global Biometrics and Mobility Report.

And as always, more information about all of Acuity’s research is available at the Acuity Research Page.


Filed under: Biometrics, Data Driven Analysis, Market Development, Market Forecast, Market Research, Mobile Biometrics, Mobility, Payments, Smart Devices | No Comments »